Diane Krys: Pseudo Serendipity

The idea of pseudo serendipity rooted in my mind a number of years ago after watching an episode of The Nature of Things in which David Suzuki explored the important role chance played in scientific discovery. While serendipity is defined as pure chance,pseudo serendipity meets chance with an informed mind. Alexander Fleming’s discovery of penicillin is a good example. It’s unlikely a layman would have recognized the possibilities in an accidental moldy petri dish, but Fleming’s expertise made connections that led to one of the most significant medical breakthroughs of all time. Using history, David Suzuki made a compelling case for a need to make room for chance and random exploration in current research and development practices. He even went so far as to suggest danger and missed opportunity if scientific research becomes too narrowly focused.

So what does this all mean to a fiber obsessed gal who’s first thought of a periodic table is, “mid century modern that seats six”? My gateway to the world of fiber art was rug hooking. Even my undying passion for this medium couldn’t keep me from straying into the broader world of fiber and textiles; felting, knitting, spinning, mixed media–you get the picture. I have a healthy curiosity and love to learn and try things.  At times in the past, I seriously wondered if I had some kind of artistic attention deficit disorder. How could I ever improve or find my artistic voice if I was moving around in different directions? Within the scientific context of Suzuki’s presentation, the triad of the seemingly unrelated, exploration and knowledge, resonated. Initially, I embraced  pseudo serendipity as a kind of validation for my scattered approach. Deeper reflection has made it a cornerstone of my own personal research and development program; engaged thinking,learning and practice, combined with time to let my mind wander and play; honing my senses for chance.

I’ve learned to trust my ways and follow my heart into new learning experiences. I don’t worry about the connective tissue or what may or may not stream into my ongoing creative practice. I enjoy taking workshops  with inspiring artists when I can. These  experiences allow me to stretch and build my skills, as well as, make an inviting space for random and chance to visit. I’ve come to know chance as a fleeting guest; often you can’t even tell it’s in the room until you have some know how and a few tricks to entertain it. It’s a magical moment to look into it’s face and see past moldy irregular features to it’s true beauty; a new idea or technique that can take my art making to a different place.

Pseudo serendipity is on my mind lately as more and more I’m experiencing my parallel explorations morphing with chance and cross pollination. It feels like the best possible reward for putting the time and effort into informing my mind; for doing the work; for honing my sensitivity to random possibilities. In my world, perhaps it’s more like peanut butter running into chocolate to make a peanut butter cup rather than a life saving discovery, but it’s oh so delicious.

“Chance favors the prepared mind.” Louis Pasteur

 Wildfire by Diane Krys, 2012. Needle felting and rug hooking.

  

Wildfire by Diane Krys, 2012.

Wildfire by Diane Krys, 2012.

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Wildfire had it’s start in a myth busting creative flurry. I wrote about it in  my April post.

Thanks for stopping in!

14 thoughts on “Diane Krys: Pseudo Serendipity

  1. Thanks Mary! I have developed a knit/hook workshop and have traveled to teach it. I’d be happy to discuss the possibility with you. You’re welcome to contact me at dkkff@shaw.ca

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  2. Diane
    Going thru some past Rug Hooking magazines and saw your work – love it!
    Do you ever teach in Ontario? Many members of the guild I belong to also knit and they might be interested in a workshop.

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  3. Diane,
    I so enjoy your work, the depth, the color and textures.
    Do you teach your pseudo serendipity style of fiber art?
    I am always looking for innovative ways to expand my rug hooking art.

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  4. Hello there Gay!

    I always appreciate your feedback. Thanks for taking the time to have a look and comment.

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  5. Deanne, It’s such a treat to be able to stop in and share a few thoughts with you and your community. Thank you for that.

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  6. Susan, I’ve been visiting and loving your blog!

    When I really embraced pseudo serendipity I found it very liberating. No more always trying to connect all the dots, justify my scattered ways, or feel guilt that I wasn’t focused enough. I’m completely indifferent to raised eyebrows when someone says, now what are you doing? Some of that stuff leads to the beastly negative energy thats put up road blocks when all you want to do is make beautiful things. For me it was a small act of faith, in the unknown and in myself.

    Thanks for your thoughts.

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  7. Linda,

    Shiny bits get me every time. I like your term chicken brain, I think I may have that too at times, but that’s another whole story…!

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  8. a great post Diane & a stunning piece. I feel like I’m finally getting the hang of pseudo serendipity & what a lovely term for “it” – the beast 😉

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  9. I like the idea of “Artistic attention deficit disorder” . I’ve always thought of it as “Chicken Brain”, … not too flattering. I’m always wanting to try something different, seldom focusing on one project at a time, … until rug hooking, that is. I may have found my calling. That and gardening, and watercolour, .. still the Raven going after shiny bits! Linda

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